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Acrosyndactyly: Are we using the term correctly?

Published:August 13, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bjps.2020.08.016
      Etymologically, the term acrosyndactyly combines acro-which can relate to height, such as in acrocephaly, or to a peripheral part, especially of the extremities, such as in acrocyanosis. To the latter is connected syn- meaning together, and dactyly-, relating to the digits.
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