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The Dunning–Kruger effect: Revisiting “the valley of despair” in the evolution of competency and proficiency in reconstructive microsurgery

Published:December 11, 2019DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bjps.2019.11.062
      A cognitive bias known as the Dunning–Kruger (DK) effect has considerable relevance in reconstructive microsurgery.
      • Kruger J.
      • Dunning D.
      Unskilled and unaware of it: how difficulties in recognizing one's own incompetence lead to inflated self-assessments.
      This effect explains that the less you know, the less you are able to recognize how little you know and your limitations. Confidence can be inflated with the belief of perceived ability beyond the reality (objective ability). The effect has relevance to the mastery of microsurgical techniques of increasing complexity, and of innovations over the duration of a career.
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