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RE: Not a plastic surgeon's best friend: Dog bites an increasing burden on UK plastic surgery services

Published:January 14, 2019DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bjps.2018.12.053
      We read with interest the article by O. Cameron et al.
      • Cameron O.
      • Al-Himdani S.
      • Oliver D.W.
      Not a plastic surgeon's best friend: Dog bites an increasing burden on UK plastic surgery services.
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      References

        • Cameron O.
        • Al-Himdani S.
        • Oliver D.W.
        Not a plastic surgeon's best friend: Dog bites an increasing burden on UK plastic surgery services.
        J Plast. Reconst. Aesthet. Surg. 2017; 70: 556-557
        • Parliament of the United Kingdom
        Anti-social behaviour, crime and policing act.
        Home Office, London, UK2014 (editor)
        • Oxley J.A.
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        Contexts and consequences of dog bite incidents.
        J. Vet. Behav. 2018; 23: 33-39
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        • House of Commons
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        Communication Workers UnionEnvironment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee, London, UK2012 (editor)

      Linked Article

      • Not a plastic surgeon's best friend: Dog bites an increasing burden on UK plastic surgery services
        Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic SurgeryVol. 70Issue 4
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          Dog bites comprise a considerable proportion of the workload of the Plastic Surgeon within the United Kingdom (UK), with injuries often necessitating surgical debridement.1 The cost to the National Health Service (NHS) estimated in 2010, for 6000 patients admitted with dog bites, was £3.3 million.2 Similar studies in the USA estimate that emergency services costs are annually approximately $102.4 million with additional hospitalization costs of $62.5 million.3 Patients also suffer considerable morbidity, disability and psychological harm.
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